Incentive Stock Options and the Alternative Minimum Tax - Changes under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017

Stock Option Counsel, P.C. - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity grants, executive compensation design, employment agreements and acquisition terms. She also counsels founders on their personal interests  at incorporation, financings and exit events. Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

The final Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 will reduce Alternative Minimum Tax ("AMT") bills for many who exercise Incentive Stock Options ("ISOs") in two ways - one direct and one indirect.

First, the bill increased exemption amounts and phase-out thresholds for the AMT as follows:

Tax Bill - Alternative Minimum Tax Changes for Individuals.PNG

The increased AMT exemption decreases the likelihood of triggering AMT at exercise of ISOs. For those ISO exercises that do trigger AMT, the increased AMT phase-out threshold may reduce the amount of AMT due. The result of these changes is a maximum savings of $18,000 for an individual exercising ISOs.

Second, the bill reduced or repealed several triggers of the prior AMT, such as state and local tax deductions. This reduces the number of taxpayers who will need to use their AMT exemption amount for non-ISO AMT items. According to Joe Rosenberg of the Tax Policy Center, as quoted in the Wall Street Journal, only about 200,000 returns will be subject to AMT in 2018 down from approximately five million in 2017. So starting in 2018 most taxpayers will not have “used up” the AMT exemption amount on non-ISO related items and therefore will be able to use the entire AMT exemption amount to offset gains at exercise of options. In addition, these new thresholds may trigger the release of AMT credit carryovers. 

These changes are somewhat anticlimactic after legislators almost repealed the entire Alternative Minimum Tax, which would have made all ISO exercises tax-free. But they may result in savings of up to approximately $18,000 in AMT for a ISO exercise.
— Mary Russell, Attorney Counsel to Individuals at Stock Option Counsel

What does this mean for existing ISO grants?

These changes are somewhat anticlimactic after legislators almost repealed the entire Alternative Minimum Tax, which would have made all ISO exercises tax-free. But they may result in savings of up to approximately $18,000 in AMT for a ISO exercise. So it makes sense to work with your tax advisor and/or financial planner to decide if/when to exercise to take advantage of the benefits of the new rules. Here are some choices on ISO exercise:

1. Early exercise some ISOs prior to vesting (if allowed under grant documents);

This is a tax planning maneuver to start your capital gains holding period and avoid paying taxes at exercise. (If you have ISOs you are considering for early exercise, you might prefer to have them converted into NSOs before early exercising. See more on this issue here.)

2. Exercise some ISOs after vesting and prior to liquidity; or

Precisely planning your ISO exercises can allow you to take advantage of the ISO benefits, which will be more favorable under the revised AMT limits. Work with your accountant or financial advisor to determine precisely how many ISOs can be exercised per year to fall within the AMT exemption amount for your phase-out threshold status.

3. Wait to exercise all ISOs until the shares will be sold to pay the taxes due at liquidity and the exercise price.

This is likely to have the highest tax rates but the lowest investment risk. However, if the ISOs expire early at employment termination, leaving your job may make this impossible. More on this issue here.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR NEGOTIATING A NEW STOCK OPTION OFFER?

ISOs are more favorable than NSOs (unless you are early exercising while the exercise price is equal to the FMV). The revised AMT limits make their benefits even more appealing. So, if you are negotiating a stock option offer, make sure the grant will qualify as ISOs up to the limits under the law.

I would be happy to hear from you if you are navigating an existing option grant or negotiating a new offer. For more information, please see this FAQ or contact me at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Stock Option Counsel, P.C. - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity grants, executive compensation design, employment agreements and acquisition terms. She also counsels founders on their personal interests  at incorporation, financings and exit events. Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Exercising an Incentive Stock Option (ISO)? Should You Hold the Stock?

This is a guest post from Michael Gray CPA. He counsels individuals on their employee stock option tax questions. For more employee stock option tax resources, see Michael Gray, CPA's Option Alert at StockOptionAdvisors.com.  

When you have decided to exercise an incentive stock option (ISO) and consider the federal alternative minimum tax (AMT) and the net investment income tax, the benefits of holding stock after exercising an incentive stock option are reduced. The "brass ring" of having the gain from the sale of the stock eligible for long-term capital gains rates (15% or 20%) seems attractive, but the 28% alternative minimum tax rate applies
for the excess of the fair market value of the stock at exercise over the option price ("spread") when the option is exercised.  (California also has a 7% alternative minimum tax. Find out the rules for your state.)  The minimum tax credit for this tax "prepayment" is hard for many taxpayers to recover, because they are already subject to the AMT, due to deductions disallowed for the AMT computation, including state income taxes, real estate taxes and miscellaneous itemized deductions.  That means the "spread" at exercise is probably
going to be taxed at a 28% federal tax rate when the dust settles.

In addition, long-term capital gains are subject to the 3.8% net investment income tax when the taxpayer has high adjusted gross income.  That means the total federal tax rate for the initial spread would be 31.8%, versus a maximum federal tax rate of 39.6%.  Is an 8% tax benefit worth the risk of exposure to market volatility of the stock?  It could fall much more than that.

The main time it makes sense to hold the stock is when the "spread" is low and the option price is low.  Then you can probably afford to pay for the stock and AMT (if any) and to take the risk that the value of the stock could fall.  When you do this, you forgo the "time value premium" for the option.  If you have the alternative of just buying the stock for about the same price without exercising the option, you will probably be in a better position by doing that, because you will still have the options to exercise if the value of the stock increases with no downside risk for the options.

An alternative is to exercise the option and immediately sell the stock, provided the stock is publicly traded or there is a "liquidity event" such as a sale of the employer company.  In that case, the gain will be taxed as additional wages, subject to federal tax rates up to 39.6%, but exempt from employment
taxes such as social security and medicare taxes.

These are general comments.  You really should meet with a tax professional familiar with incentive stock options (that's our business!) to discuss your individual situation and have tax planning computations done.  To make an appointment with Michael Gray, call Dawn Siemer at (408)918-3162 on Mondays,
Wednesdays, Thursdays or Fridays.

This article was published in the September 24, 2014 Option Advisor Alert. Republished with permission. 

Source: http://www.stockoptionadvisors.com/optiona...