In the News: Startup Employees in the Dark on Equity

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Mary Russell, an attorney who founded Stock Option Counsel to help employees evaluate their equity compensation, says the first step is for employees to make sure any equity is theirs to keep. Some companies have repurchase rights in their equity agreements that give them a right to buy back shares and options from any employee who leaves; and some give founders or investors broad latitude to change the terms.

“If the company can take back employee shares it dramatically limits the value of those shares,” says Ms. Russell. “It’s the sort of thing an employee needs to know about when they go into a job.” She says it’s as simple as asking whether the company can take back vested shares.
— Katie Benner, The Information

See Katie Benner's full article, Startup Employees in the Dark on Equity. The Information is a subscription publication for professionals who need the inside scoop on technology news and trends. 

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Repurchase Rights are "Horrible" for Employees

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

As an aside, some companies now write in a repurchase right on vested shares at the current common price when an employee leaves. It’s fine if the company wants to offer to repurchase the shares, but it’s horrible for the company to be able to demand this.
— Sam Altman, YC

What can you do about it? Ask before you join:

Can the company take back my vested shares?
— Mary Russell, Stock Option Counsel

For more from Sam Altman, see his post, Employee Equity. For more on questions to ask to make sure you have true startup equity, see our post, Startup Equity Standards - A Guide for Employees.

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

The Gold Standard of Startup Equity - A Guide for Employees

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Learn the three standards that define Startup Equity and three questions to ask to know if you have the real thing. 

1. Ownership - “Can the company take back my vested shares?”

2. Risk/Reward - “What information can you provide to help me evaluate the offer?”

3. Tax Benefits - “Is this equity designed for capital gains tax rates and tax deferral?”

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Links - Best web content on startup employee stock

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Here's links to the best web content on startup employee stock:

1.  Risk/Reward

Calculating percentage ownership and understanding fully diluted capital, #1-2 of The 14 Crucial Questions About Stock Options, Andy Rachleff, the Wealthfront Blog

How to value an offer, Right to Value How-To, Stock Option Counsel Blog

How to use the company's VC valuation to evaluate your equity offer, Video, Stock Option Counsel Blog

How to calculate the future value of your equity by estimating dilution and valuation, John Greathouse's Blog

How to ask about valuation, #11-13 of The 14 Crucial Questions About Stock Options, Andy Rachleff, the Wealthfront Blog

How preferred stock rights make common stock less valuable, Stock Option Counsel Blog

Knowing your market rate with regards to startup equity, #3-4 of The 14 Crucial Questions About Stock Options, Andy Rachleff, the Wealthfront Blog

How to know how much is enough equity for a pre-Series A startup, Stock Option Counsel Blog

Four factors of how startups decide your salary and equity Mary Russell & Boris Esptein on the Stock Option Counsel Blog

Four factors of how startup decide your equity offer VIDEO Mary Russell & Boris Esptein on the Stock Option Counsel Blog

Negotiating Compensation An Engineer's Guide to Silicon Valley Startups

2. Vesting

Acceleration upon change of control, Gil Silberman on Quora

When acceleration upon change of control does not make sense, Gil Silberman on Quora

What is vesting; what is acceleration upon change of control? #5 & #8 of 14 Crucial Questions about Stock Options, Andy Rachleff, Wealthfront Blog

Does my vesting make sense? Stock Option Counsel Blog

3. Ownership

Can the company take back my vested shares if I leave?, #6 of The 14 Crucial Questions About Stock Options, Andy Rachleff, the Wealthfront Blog

How Skype's repurchase rights gave certain employees $0 of $8.5 billion acquisition payouts, Felix Salmon on Reuters Blog

4. Tax Benefits

Three Ways to Avoid Tax Problems When You Exercise Options, Bob Guenley, Wealthfront Blog

Ensuring company compliance with tax rules - and your tax rights - when negotiating an offer, #9-10 of 14 Crucial Questions About Stock Options, Andy Rachleff on the Wealthfront Blog

Incentive stock options, Michael Gray, CPA

Non-qualified employee stock options Michael Gray, CPA

5. Overview

The 14 Crucial Questions About Stock Options, Andy Rachleff, the Wealthfront Blog

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Risk/Reward of Startup Employee Stock

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Startup employee equity should reward the risk you take in joining the company. Here's some ways to understand equity value so you can decide if your equity meets this standard.

 For more information on joining an early stage startup before there is a VC valuation, see Joining An Early Stage Startup? Negotiate Your Salary and Equity with Stock Option Counsel Tips.

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

March 14 Event: Bill of Rights Discussion

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Thanks to the 300 people who joined Chris Zaharias, @SearchQuant, and Mary Russell, Attorney Counsel to Individuals @StockOptionCnsl, for this event in Palo Alto on March 14, 2014! 

We had a great discussion of how to define and improve startup equity. For Mary Russell's current suggestions on the topic, please see Startup Equity Standards: A Guide for Employees.

Here's what we discussed at the event:

Right to Know. Company information on capitalization and valuation, being necessary to the employee’s negotiation of a fair compensation package, shall be provided to the employee with his or her equity offer and after each dilution and valuation event.

Right to Value. The right of the employee to earn the full value of his or her grant shall not be limited by unreasonable vesting terms.

Right to Hold Earned Equity. The right of the employee to hold vested equity up to an acquisition or public offering shall not be violated, and no forfeiture, repurchase or other provisions shall allow the company to seize vested equity of current or former employees.

Right to Tax Benefits. The employee shall enjoy the right to all tax benefits available from state and federal governments, and shall not be subjected to tax penalties due to company negligence, at grant, at vesting or settlement and at company acquisition or sale of stock.

Right to Ask. The right to evaluate equity shall not be violated by company limits on access to information or legal counsel.

Chris Zaharias, SearchQuant LLC

Chris is a startup veteran and advocate for startup employee equity rights. chris@searchquant.net (415) 832-0089.

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Q: How much acceleration of vesting upon a change in control do Series-A startups typically offer?

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

A: Startup would not likely offer accelerated vesting upon change of control without you asking for it. But acceleration is usually a negotiable term for anyone in mid to senior roles. 

If you frame this negotiation as a discussion of your role and what you are being brought on to accomplish, it will get to the truth of the matter - What vesting makes sense for your position in the enterprise's future? All compensation - and especially vesting schedules - should make sense for what you are there to do. But startups might not take the time to look at it in that way. 

For example, a senior engineer was brought into a Series A startup to make a big push toward efficient operations. He was so successful at his job that the startup was "finished" with him after 6 months when the operations could be managed by junior engineers. He was on a four year vesting schedule with a one year cliff. Did it make sense that he would receive zero equity for doing an amazing job at exactly the job he was hired to do? No.

If the comapny wont agree to acceleration, ask for more shares to make up for the fact that you don't expect to earn the full number of shares in your grant.

Good luck. And watch out for the precise terms of your acceleration language to be sure they make sense as well.

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Tax Deduction Reminder & Stock Option Counsel Updates

 

Stock Option Counsel

Legal Services for Individuals

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Thanks for a great year with Stock Option Counsel.

Reminder - Tax Deduction for Legal Fees

Your legal fees may be deductible on your tax return. Check with your tax advisor for more information. 

Update - Stock Option Counsel Services for Employees & Founders

Please keep us in mind as a resource for yourself and your friends and colleagues for guidance on:

  • Job offers, equity grants and employment agreements
  • Stock option exercise and tax choices
  • Sales of employee stock on the secondary market
  • Post-acquisition employment agreements
  • Founders' interests at incorporation, financings, and exits
  • Dispute resolution among founders and employees on startup equity

Our Blog - Articles and Videos on Employee Equity

We use the Stock Option Counsel Blog to share information on negotiating job offers and selling startup stock. Please send us any requests for additions to the blog. Here's some links to our most popular posts:

Joining An Early Stage Startup? Equity Tips

Bull's Eye - Negotiating the Right Job Offer

RSUs - Startup Restricted Stock Units

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

MARY RUSSELL • ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 

125 UNIVERSITY AVENUE, SUITE 220 • PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA 94301

INFO@STOCKOPTIONCOUNSEL.COM • (650) 326-3412

©2014 STOCK OPTION COUNSEL • DISCLAIMER

Startup Negotiations: How Preferred Stock Makes Employee Stock Less Valuable

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

If you have a job offer from a startup with an option to purchase shares representing 1% of the company, you may want to consider the Preferred Stock "Liquidation Preference" to see if your 1% would really be 1% if the company is acquired. If the Liquidation Preference is high, you might want to negotiate for more shares to make up for the loss in value you can expect when the company is acquired.

Common Stock v. Preferred Stock

As a startup employee, you'll be getting Common Stock (as options, RSUs or restricted stock). When venture capitalists invest in startups, they receive Preferred Stock. Preferred Stock comes with the right to preferential treatment in merger payouts, voting rights, and dividends. If the company / founders have caved and given venture capitalists a lot of preferred rights - like a 3X Liquidation Preference or Participating Preferred Stock , those rights will dramatically reduce your payouts in an acquisition.

Liquidation Preference & How It Makes Employee Stock Less Valuable

One Preferred Stock right is a "Liquidation Preference." Without a Liquidation Preference, each stockholder – preferred or common – would receive a percentage of the acquisition price equal to the stockholder's percentage ownership in the company. If the company were acquired for $15 million, and an employee owned 1% of the company, the employee would be paid out $150,000.

With a Liquidation Preference, preferred stockholders are guaranteed to be paid a set dollar amount of the acquisition price, even if that guaranteed payout is greater than their percentage ownership in the company.

Here’s an example of the difference. An investor buys 5 million shares of Preferred Stock for $1 per share for a total of $5 million. After the financing, there are 20 million shares of common stock and 5 million shares of Preferred Stock outstanding. The company is then acquired for $15 million.                                                                                                                           

Without a Liquidation Preference, each stockholder (common or preferred) would receive $0.60 per share. That’s $15 million / 25 million shares. A hypothetical employee who held 1% of the company or 250000 shares) would receive $150,000 (that’s 1% of $15 million).

If the preferred stockholders had a 1X Liquidation Preference and Non-Participating Preferred Stock, they would receive 1X their investment ($5 million) before any Common Stock is paid in an acquisition. They would receive the first $5 million of the acquisition price, and the remaining $10 million would be divided among the 20 million shares of common stock outstanding ($10 million / 20 million shares of common stock). Each common stockholder would be paid $0.50 per share, and hypothetical employee who held 1% of the company would receive $125,000.

Ugly, Non-Standard Rights That Diminish Employee Stock Value

The standard Liquidation Preference is 1X. This makes sense, as the investors expect to receive their investment dollars back before employees and founders are rewarded for creating value. But some company founders give preferred stockholders multiple Liquidation Preferences or Participation Rights that cut more dramatically into employee stock payouts in an acquisition.

If preferred stockholders had a 3X Liquidation Preference, they would be paid 3X their original investment before common stock was paid out. In this example, preferred would be paid 3X their $5 million investment for a total of $15 million, and the common stockholders would receive $0. ($15 million acquisition price – $15 million Liquidation Preference = $0 paid to common stockholders)

Preferred stock may also have "Participation Rights," which would change our first example above to give preferred stockholders an even larger portion of the acquisition price.

Without Participation Rights, Preferred Stockholders must choose to either receive their Liquidation Preference or participate in the division of the full acquisition price among the all stockholders. In the first example above, the preferred stockholders held 20% of the company and had a $5 million Liquidation Preference. When the company was acquired for $15 million, the preferred stockholders had the choice to receive their $5 million liquidation preference or to participate in an equal distribution of the proceeds to all stockholders. The equal distribution would have given them $3 million (20% of $15 million acquisition price), so they chose to take their $5 million liquidation preference, and the remaining $10 million was divided among 20 million shares of common stock.

If the Preferred Stock also had Participation Rights, (which is called Participating Preferred Stock), they would receive their Liquidation Preference and participate in the distribution of the remaining proceeds.

In our example with a 1X Liquidation Preference but adding a Participation Right, the Participating Preferred Stock would receive their $5 million Liquidation Preference AND a portion of the remaining $10 million of the acquisition price equal to their % ownership in the company.

$5 million Liquidation Preference + ((5 million shares / 25 million shares outstanding) * $10 million) = $7 million

Common stockholders would receive (20 million shares common stock / 25 million shares outstanding) * $10 million = $8 million.

Our hypothetical employee who held 1% of the company would receive $100,000 (.01 * $10 million) or 0.67% of the acquisition price.

Employee Focus – Calculating Your Payout

If you are an employee of a startup, you can use Liquidation Preference as shorthand for the minimum price the company would have to be acquired for before any employees would be paid out. 

If the acquisition price is less than the Liquidation Preference, common stockholders will get $0 in the acquisition.

If you want to go further and understand what you would be paid out if the acquisition price is more than the Liquidation Preference, consider these three scenarios:

If the preferred stockholders have Participating Preferred Stock, Your Payout = (Acquisition Price – Liquidation Preference) * Your % of All Outstanding Stock

If the preferred stockholders have Non-Participating Preferred Stock, you will receive the lower of:

Your Payout = (Acquisition Price – Liquidation Preference) * Your % of Common Stock OR

Your Payout = Acquisition Price * Your % Ownership

Employee Focus – What to Ask the Company

These calculations are complicated, so if you are evaluating a job offer you might want to stay out of these details leave it up to the company to tell you how the Liquidation Preference would affect you in an acquisition. Use these questions to understand how the Liquidation Preference would reduce the value of your common stock in an acquisition. Simply ask the CFO these questions:

1. What is the total Liquidation Preference? Do the investors have Participation Rights?

2. If the company were purchased today at the most recent VC valuation, what would my shares be worth?

3. If the company were purchased today at 2X the most recent VC valuation, what would my shares be worth? 

3. If the company were purchased today at 10X the most recent VC valuation, what would my shares be worth?

This will give you a good feel for how heavy the VC Liquidation Preferences are and how they would weigh down the growth in value of the common stock.

Founder Focus – Negotiating Your Acquisition Payout

If you are a founder and are negotiating with an acquiror, consider renegotiating your investors’ Liquidation Preference payout. Everything is negotiable in an acquisition, including the division of the acquisition price among founders, investors and employees. Do not get pushed around by your investors here, as their rights in the documents do not have to determine their payout.

If your investors are pushing to receive the full Liquidation Preference and leaving you and/or your employees with a small cut of the payout, address this with your investment bankers. They may be able to help you play your acquiror against the investors so that you are not cut out of the wealth of the deal, as most acquirors want the founders and employees to receive enough of the acquisition price to inspire them to stay with the company after acquisition.

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Thanks to investment banker Michael Barker for his comments on founder merger negotiations. Michael is a Managing Director at Shea & Company, LLC,  a technology-focused investment bank and leading strategic advisor to the software industry.

Would a sale of private company /startup common stock by a former employee trigger a change in 409A / fair market value?

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Short answer:

Not in all cases. It comes down to logic. How significant is the market for this company's stock? Is it enough to really show there is a market? Or that there is a clear value? Probably not, unless it is a company-sponsored sale or a Facebook-type frenzy. But companies do use this as an excuse to prohibit secondary sales or drag their feet on allowing their employees to do them.

Lawyer answer:

Based on the tax code rules, the Board needs to change the fair market value price at which they grant options / employee stock any time a major change has occurred that either reduces risk or materially changes company forecasts. Is a secondary sale of private company stock a material change that would have to be seen by the Board as a sign that the risk of investment in common stock has changed?

There are arguments on both sides of this question.

One one side, the secondary sale of shares of common stock shows that common stock is "liquid," or convertible into cash. The lack of liquidity is a big factor in the riskiness of stock and in the logic of discounting common stock value compared to preferred stock value, so liquidity for common stock would raise the "market" price of common stock. Also, the investor who invested has clearly signaled that he/she thinks the stock is less risky than the prior 409A valuation if he/she pays more than that valuation.

However, there are good arguments on the other side as well. The basic argument is that a one-off sale of common stock does not a market make. When you look at the FMV of publicly traded stock, it is based on many sales and the presumption that anyone who holds common stock can trade at any time. Small sales of private company common stock do not mean that any shareholder could find a buyer or that any shareholder could sell at that price. Another argument is that a single buyer or even group of buyers who do not have access to inside company information do not have enough information to know if the stock is more or less risky than the Board has determined it to be in setting the FMV. So one buyer or small group of buyers acting with limited information would not be the appropriate group to define the risk of the stock and, therefore, its fair market value.

Many thanks to Aranca for the following additions to this analysis:

In addition to 2 key points (# of sale points for the price paid, and profile of buyer + seller) that have been mentioned for assessing reasonability of price paid as reflection of FMV, I would like to add 2 more angles that would need to be evaluated while making the determination:

How many different buyers participated at the price that has been paid for the security: If there have been lets say a couple of parties that have transacted, the applicability for the price paid to be considered as reflection of FMV would be weak. However, if there are several buyers who bought from the seller, the applicability of price paid as a FMV can be high.

What has been the valuation range (if any) / bid-ask spread offered by buyers: If the available buyers give a valuation range which is wide and significantly different from the transacted price, then again the applicability of price paid as reflection of FMV becomes questionable. However, if there are sizable number of buyers providing a tight valuation range, then the applicability of price paid as an FMV can be a good indicator.

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Many thanks for the contributions of Dylan Gittleman, Vice-President, ARANCA US and Manpreet Singh, ASA, Manager, Valuation Services, ARANCA US. Aranca is a leading provider of 409A valuation services.

Bull’s Eye: Negotiating the Right Job Offer

Bulls Eye: Negotiating the Right Job Offer.jpg

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Boris Epstein is the founder of BINC Search, a next-generation recruiting startup that helps Silicon Valley companies hire technical talent at the scale they need.

You’re negotiating your salary and equity. You know there is a right answer – a bull’s eye where the final offer should land. But where is it?

The company is deciding what to offer you. They know there is a right answer, and they’ll get there using these four factors:

1.     Past Comp – your salary and equity in current and past jobs

2.     Peer Comp – the salary and equity of others in your peer group within this company

3.     Desired Comp – what you want to get paid, regardless of other indicators

4.     Market Comp – your competitive offers in the market

The right offer for you is the bull’s eye at the center of these possible offers. You can maximize your final offer by thoughtfully using these factors in your negotiation.

Past Comp

The company may ask you to disclose your compensation in your previous positions – your Past Comp.

If you disclose these numbers, be sure to include detail or “color” on the numbers to show the true value of your Past Comp. Do you believe your salary was lower than it should have been because of difficult financial circumstance at the company? Are you overdue for a review and raise? Does your company have valuable equity or a bonus structure that should be included to accurately describe your Past Comp? Are you expecting to continue vesting or receive additional stock option grants that you would forfeit by leaving your company?

A thoughtful discussion of your Past Comp may be more effective than following the lore that you should never disclose this information. You can use your answer to the question to guide the company to the right offer.

Peer Comp

The company also considers your Peer Comp – the range this company is already paying employees in similar positions. You start shaping this number during your interview as you discuss roles, levels and opportunities and present information to help the company understand where you fit to add the most value to the team.

For a company with a thoughtful system of leveling, there will be names or labels for each position and a range of salaries and equity packages they offer within each level. Your negotiation work is to distinguish yourself and show that you are a peer of those being paid at the highest end of the range for your level based on your unique skill set or experience.

The more unique your position, the less experience a startup will have in defining your Peer Comp. If you are a first-hire designer, physician or other leadership or expert role, you may have to help the company understand who your peers will be.  This is especially important in early-stage startups, where the hiring team might not understand that your new role should be considered a peer of, for example, vice presidents rather than junior engineers.

Desired Comp

The company also considers your Desired Comp – what you want to get paid. This is highly relevant to the right offer.

Desired Comp is especially important in equity packages, where your evaluation of the company’s equity may vary greatly from another candidate’s evaluation of that package. If you’ve been hoping for a home run exit during your career, you’ll be looking for an equity package that could get you there. If you’re strapped for cash and looking to maximize salary, you will have less desire for an equity-heavy final offer.   

There may be some tradeoffs, of course, but the right offer will be centered on your Desired Comp. So do your self-reflection homework and know what you want.

Market Comp

Companies take into account Market Comp and need to know what they will have to offer to stay competitive. While companies have a general idea of what is “market” for each position, your personal Market Comp is unique and driven by your efforts to identify alternative offers. The only way to use the right Market Comp in your negotiation is to go out to the market, derive that information and communicate it to the company.  

Once you have competitive offers, evaluate the equity packages and make thoughtful comparisons between them. For example, based on your appetite for risk and financial considerations, would you prefer options to purchase 1% of a Series A startup with a company valuation of $5 million or 5,000 RSUs of a public company with a current market price per share of $10? How many more stock options would the Series A startup have to offer you to equate to the public company offer? The company cannot make this estimation for you any more than they can decide which company is the best fit for your personality. When you own this process, you can confidently and effectively communicate to your company what is “market” for your equity offer.

Market Comp is also relevant after hire, as the startup job market can shift dramatically over time and new opportunities are always surfacing. As you continually find new information about opportunities, you can continually communicate with your company about what is “market” in defining the right salary and equity for your position. 

Bull’s Eye: The Right Offer

With thoughtful attention to these four factors, you can use your negotiation to guide the company to the bull’s eye – the right offer for you. If you see the company using the wrong data, you can bring the conversation back to the truth as you see it and work toward the right outcome. 

For more help on these preparations, you are welcome to read the full text of our interview here: The Right Offer – Long Form Q&A Between Stock Option Counsel and BINC Search

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Boris Epstein is the founder of BINC Search, a next-generation recruiting startup that helps Silicon Valley companies hire technical talent at the scale they need.

Negotiating the Right Job Offer – Long Form Q&A Between Stock Option Counsel and BINC Search

Thanks for reading our shorter blog post: Bull's Eye - Negotiating the Right Job Offer. This is the full Q&A between Mary Russell and Boris Epstein. It’s long, but it’s full of lots of insights on how to negotiate the right compensation offer from a company.

Mary Russell counsels individual employees and founders to negotiate, maximize and monetize their stock options and other startup stock. She is an attorney and the founder of Stock Option Counsel.

Boris Epstein is the founder of BINC Search, a next-generation recruiting startup that helps Silicon Valley companies hire technical talent at the scale they need.

Mary Russell, Attorney @ Stock Option Counsel: Welcome, Boris. I’ve always enjoyed our discussions on compensation negotiations because you seem to believe that a candidate and a company can discover a “right offer.” Employees who come to me for Stock Option Counsel want to get to that “right offer” for salary and equity, and I’m happy you’ve joined us to share your perspective on how to get there.

Boris Epstein, Founder @ BINC Search: Thank you. I think there is a right offer in a compensation negotiation, and companies and candidates arrive there by identifying four data points:

1.     The candidate’s Past Comp

2.     The Peer Comp of the candidate’s level within the company

3.     The candidate’s Desired Comp and

4.     The Market Comp or competitive scenarios in the market

The epicenter of all the different data points would be what they would arrive at to get a right offer. So if all four numbers align, it’s really easy. If the four numbers are divergent in some way, then someone’s going to have to make tradeoffs and concessions. If the person’s making $100,000 but then they want $200,000, and market’s $150,000, someone’s going to have to make a tradeoff somewhere to arrive at the right package.

READ LOTS MORE ...

Read More

VIDEO Startup Stock Options: Negotiate the Right Startup Stock Option Offer

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Stock Option Counsel for individual employees and founders in all matters relating to startup stock options or other employee stock. This video describes stock options in a simple, accessible way. 

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

VIDEO Startup Stock Options: Startup Valuation

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Stock Option Counsel for individual employees and founders in all matters relating to startup stock options or other employee stock. This video describes startup valuation for employees in a thoughtful, accessible way. 

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

VIDEO Startup Stock Options: Exercise Price Basics

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.

Stock Option Counsel for individual employees and founders in all matters relating to startup stock options or other employee stock. This video describes stock options in a simple, accessible way. 

Stock Option Counsel - Legal Services for Individuals.  Attorney Mary Russell counsels individuals on equity offer evaluation and negotiation, stock option exercise and tax choices, and sales of startup stock.  Please see this FAQ about her services or contact her at (650) 326-3412 or by email.